InternationalUSRemember you can easily switch between MIP US and MIP International at any time

How is evidence collection and trade secret protection managed during litigation?




Takanori Abe of Abe & Partners analyses the different ways of handling evidence collection during patent litigation as well as the management of trade secret protection issues that arise as a result

Litigation procedure and situations where evidence collection and trade secret protection become an issue

Dispositions on the collection of evidence prior to the filing of an action (Code of Civil Procedure, Articles 132-2-132-9) is a tool to collect evidence before filing a lawsuit. However, they are not used in practice because they are not coercive and potential plaintiffs do not want to be known by opponents regarding potential filings. Preservation of evidence (Code of Civil Procedure, Articles 234-242) can be used before and during the lawsuit to collect evidence. After filing a lawsuit, the obligation to clarify specific circumstances (Patent Act, Article 104-2) may urge the accused infringer to disclose their conduct. The submission of documents (Patent Act, Article 105) exists. The court can use in camera inspection (Patent Act, Article 105(2)) to examine whether an obligation to submit exists.

Parties who are urged to disclose trade secrets by these evidence collection procedures can avoid trade secret leakage by confidentiality protective orders (Patent Act, Article 105-4) and restrictions on inspection to preserve confidential information (Code of Civil Procedure, Article 92).

Details

Preservation of evidence

Preservation of evidence is a procedure to examine the evidence in advance and preserve it when it would be difficult to use the evidence if waiting for the official examination of the evidence in the lawsuit. It is used in medical malpractice cases but rarely used in intellectual property cases. According to the Tokyo District Court IP department's statistics, the number of filings of preservation of evidence was nine in 2013, five in 2014 and one in 2015. Preservation of evidence is not coercive, thus a respondent can refuse entry to the factory and submission of inspected evidence if legitimate reason to refuse the submission due to the existence of the trade secret. Trade secret protection is not sufficient as in practice confidentiality protective orders cannot be issued in the preservation of evidence before filing a lawsuit. Bad example exists. This applies when a court does not have an IP department videotaped inside a factory without limitation and recorded it in the inspection minutes.

Submission of documents

Submission of documents is a special rule of obligation to submit documents (Code of Civil Procedure, Article 220) in which the court orders parties to submit documents when they do not voluntarily submit them.

The number of motion for submission of documents was around 50 in 2015 at the Tokyo District Court IP department. As the number of new filings annually is around 330, motion for submission of documents is made in one in around 6.6 cases. The number of motions for submission of documents to prove infringement and to prove damages are almost the same, but the former is a little bit larger than the latter.

For the submission of documents to be issued, both the requirements relating to necessity and legitimate reason to refuse should be satisfied (Patent Act, Article 105(1)).

For the motion for submission of documents to prove infringement, to avoid fishing expeditions the court held petitioner should prove, prima facie, reasonable doubt of infringement and cautiously examined the necessity requirement. Order for the submission of documents are issued many times to prove damages, however, for proving infringement they have only been issued in two cases and generally the necessity requirement is denied. A judge explained the reason why almost no orders for submission of documents were made. As the order compels the party to submit a secret which they definitely do not want their direct competitors to know, the court should carefully examine whether it is necessary evidence for a judgment, and the possibility of a fishing expedition or an abusive application. Judges are facing difficulty controlling the situation. However, recently the judgment of March 28 2016, IP High Court (Presiding Judge Shimizu) held that prima facie proof of infringement itself is not required but prima facie proof of reasonable doubt of existence of infringement to dispel the possibility of a fishing expedition or an abusive application is sufficient, and thereby lowered the threshold of the necessity requirement. Whether the issuance of submission of documents to prove infringement will increase from now on should be paid attention to.

When judging legitimate reason to refuse submission, the court should compare the necessity for trade secret protection and the necessity for evidence. Containing trade secrets is an insufficient reason to refuse submission but disadvantage, which cannot be avoided by confidentiality protective orders, is needed as submission of documents is designed to be used with confidentiality protective orders. Legitimate reason to refuse submission may not exist if infringement is found by in camera inspection.

In camera inspection

In camera inspection allows the person who possesses the document to disclose the document and only the judges to review it to examine whether submission of documents should be granted. In camera procedure is rarely used, but a judgment of March 28 2016, IP High Court (Presiding Judge Shimizu) used it, which attracted attention.

The in camera procedure was restricted to judging whether legitimate reason to reject submission exist. The 2018 Patent Act amendment allowed in camera procedure to judge whether documents are necessary to prove infringement or calculate damages. According to this amendment, for example, in camera procedure can be used when the structure of the product in question is in dispute and the defendant alleges that they cannot disclose the structure of the product due to it being a trade secret. If the party who submits documents for in camera inspection agrees, the court can disclose documents to technical advisors and seek their expert opinion (Patent Act, Article 105(4)).

Confidentiality protective orders

Confidentiality protective orders prohibit briefs and evidence which contain trade secrets from being used for any purpose other than conducting litigation and from being disclosed to any person other than the one who is subject to the confidentiality protective order. Thereby, confidentiality protective orders help prevent trade secrets being disclosed in the litigation procedure heightening trade secret protection.

The number of issued confidentiality protective orders is small. In the Tokyo District Court, the numbers were one in 2008, three in 2009, one in 2010, three in 2011, five in 2012, four in 2013, two in 2014 and one in 2015. The reason for this small number is a severe criminal sanction against violation of the order. As confidentiality protective orders impose heavy burdens on parties, attorneys, and courts, in practice the court carefully examines whether a non-disclosure agreement and an inspection to preserve confidential information are sufficient, and judges whether confidentiality protective orders are necessary.

The first confidentiality protective orders were issued in a pharmaceutical patent infringement case (judgment of September 15 2006, Tokyo District Court, Presiding Judge Takabe). A generic drug maker filed a motion for confidentiality protective orders regarding the information (test method, standard, etc.) described in the written application for import approval of a generic drug submitted to the Ministry of Health, Labour and Welfare to examine the identity of a brand name drug approved under pharmaceutical affairs law. The court issued confidentiality protective orders.

Confidentiality protective orders can be issued in a preliminary injunction (judgment of January 27 2009, Supreme Court). Explanatory sessions should be held carefully if confidentiality protective orders have been issued. Technical advisors come with a risk of contamination and therefore are not easily selected. The attendance of company personnel is also difficult. Attorneys subject to confidentiality protective orders need to avoid including information about trade secrets subject to the order in briefs submitted after the order and should be cautious not to orally mention trade secrets at the hearing. The effect of a confidentiality protective order remains until vacated, thus companies should keep the contact information of company personnel subject to the order irrespective of their movement and retirement so that companies can ensure that the order is being complied with.

The scope of the people subject to the confidentiality protective order is an issue. If company personnel is subject to the order, contamination risk arises and it is practically impossible for that person to conduct business related to the development of that product. If the documents are subject to attorneys' eyes only under a US protective order, subjecting company personnel to the order will be a violation of the US protective order. Opinions are split about whether experts can be subject to the order. If they are denied, parties cannot conduct activity fully with the aid of experts. Whether the law should be amended to allow third party experts to be subject to the order is under discussion.

It is common to discuss among parties whether a non-disclosure agreement can be formed before a confidentiality protective order is issued. The amount of the penalty, subject of trade secrets, and recipients of trade secrets will usually be disputed.

Inspection to preserve confidential information

Inspection to preserve confidential information limits the inspection of the confidential information in the case record to the parties and prohibits third party inspection. IP judges are fully aware of the importance of trade secret protection, thus compared with usual civil cases inspection to preserve confidential information is more easily granted in IP cases.

Amendment of the Patent Act

Inspection

Amendment of the law has been discussed as evidence collection methods in patent infringement lawsuits do not function sufficiently under the current legal system. The US discovery system was not referenced as it is too extreme and expensive and may not match the Japanese system. European evidence collection procedure may match and the German inspection system can be a good reference. In the German inspection system, an inspector, who is a technical expert having a confidentiality obligation and appointed by the court, enters the factory of the accused infringer, inspects evidence possessed by the accused infringer, and submits the report to the court. However, introduction was suspended due to strong concern about trade secret leakage from the industry. For example, the concern that there would be a serious problem if someone enters a factory based on alleged evidence collection and urges the factory to disclose a manufacturing method or tries to steal know-how was expressed.

The discussion resumed and the inspection system was introduced in the Patent Act in the 2019 amendment (amended Patent Act, Article 105-2). When there is a possibility of patent infringement, a neutral technical expert (inspector) enters the factory of the accused infringer, conducts the necessary investigation regarding infringement proof, and submits a report to the court. Inspection is allowed only after filing a lawsuit. Inspection will be granted when there is i) a necessity to prove infringement; ii) a probability of infringement; iii) no other means of adequate evidence collection; and iv) to avoid an excessive burden on the alleged infringer. The inspector will enter the opponent's factory, conduct an inquiry, ask for submission of documents and conduct machine operation, measurements, experiments, and other conduct permitted by the court. No entry to third parties' factories will be made. The opponent has an obligation to cooperate to collect materials. If the opponent refuses the requests of the inspector which is permitted by the court, the court has discretion to find the petitioner's allegation to be true. The inspector submits an inspection report to the court. A copy of the inspection report will be served to the inspected party. The inspected party can ask the court within two weeks after the service not to disclose all or part of the inspection report to the petitioner. The court can grant such a motion if legitimate reason exists. Inspection will start to be used in practice within one and half years from May 17 2019. We should pay attention to how the court will run this new system.


特許訴訟における証拠収集手続きおよび営業秘密保護

1 訴訟手続きの流れと、証拠収集手続きおよび営業秘密保護

訴え提起前の証拠収集手続きとして、訴えの提起前における証拠収集の処分等(民事訴訟法132条の2~9)がある。ただ、強制力がないこと、訴え提起予定であることを相手方に知られたくないと考えることが多いこと等から、実効性がなく、利用されていない。訴え提起の前後を通して、証拠保全(民事訴訟法234条~242条)による証拠収集を試みることができる。訴え提起後は、具体的態様の明示義務(特許法104条の2)により、被疑侵害者から行為態様が開示されることが期待できる。また、書類提出命令(特許法105条)も定められており、裁判所は提出義務の有無を判断する際、インカメラ手続(特許法105条2項)を用いることができる。

他方、これらの証拠収集手続きによって営業秘密の開示を迫られる当事者としては、秘密保持命令(特許法105条の4)や閲覧制限(民事訴訟法92条)によって、営業秘密の漏えいを阻止することができる。

2 各論

2-1 証拠保全

証拠保全とは、訴訟における正規の証拠調べを待っていたのではその証拠方法の使用が困難となる事情がある場合に、あらかじめその証拠を取り調べ、その結果を保存する手続きである。

証拠保全は、医療過誤事件においては活用されているが、知財事件においてはほとんど活用されていない。東京地裁知財部の統計によると、証拠保全の申立事件数は、平成25年に9件、平成26年に5件、平成27年に1件である。

証拠保全には強制力がないため、営業秘密を根拠に提出を拒むべき正当な理由がある場合は、工場等への立入りや検証物の提示を拒絶することもできる。他方、訴えの提起前の証拠保全では秘密保持命令は発令できないとされており、営業秘密保護は十分ではない。知財専門部が存在しない裁判所での証拠保全において、工場内を無制約にビデオ撮影等し、そのまま検証調書の一部を構成した例もある。

2-2 書類提出命令

書類提出命令とは、民事訴訟法上の文書提出命令(民事訴訟法220条)の特則で、文書を任意に提出しない相手方に対して裁判所が提出を命じるものである。

平成27年度の書類提出命令の申立件数は、東京地裁知財部で年間約50件である。新受件数が年間約330件であるので、約6.6件に1件、書類提出命令が申し立てられている。侵害立証のための申立てと損害立証のための申立ての2つがあるが、両者の割合はほぼ同数で、若干、侵害立証のための申立ての方が多い。

書類提出命令が認められるためには、必要性と、提出を拒むことについての正当な理由がないことの2つの要件を満たす必要がある(特許法105条1項)。

侵害立証のための書類提出命令の申立てにおいては、裁判所は、模索的濫訴を防止するために、申立人(特許権者)の側で侵害であることを合理的に疑わしめる程度の疎明を尽くすことが必要とされると解し、必要性の要件を慎重に判断してきた。実際の発令件数においても、損害計算においては書類提出命令が多数発令されているのに対し、侵害立証において書類提出命令が発令された事例は2件しか見当たらず、ほとんどの事案で必要性が否定されている。侵害立証目的の書類提出命令が発令されたケースがほとんどない点については、裁判官から、「競合相手に知られたくない秘密を出せという話になる以上、裁判所としては、判断に必要な証拠かを慎重に吟味せざるを得ず、探索的・濫用的な申立てではないかを、相手方の営業秘密の保護を図りながら検討している」との実情が紹介され、難しいかじ取りを迫られていることが明らかになった。しかし、近時、知財高判平成28年3月28日(判タ1428号53頁)(清水裁判長)が、「当該訴訟の要証事実である侵害行為自体の疎明を求めるものではなく、濫用的・探索的申立ての疑いが払拭される程度に、侵害行為の存在について合理的な疑いを生じたことが疎明されれば足りる」と判示し、必要性のハードルを下げる判断を下した。今後、侵害立証のための書類提出命令の発令が増えるか、注目される。

裁判所は、書類の提出を拒める「正当な理由」を判断する際は、秘密としての保護の程度と証拠としての必要性を比較衡量する。また、書類提出命令が秘密保持命令の併用を前提とした規定であること等に照らし、書類が営業秘密を含むことだけでは足りず、秘密保持命令によっても回避し得ない不利益があることを要すると解されている。インカメラ審理により侵害であることが明らかである場合には、必要性が認められ、「正当な理由」は乏しい。

2-3 インカメラ手続

インカメラ手続とは、文書の所持者に文書を開示させ、裁判所限りで書類提出命令の要件を満たしているかを検討するものである。

インカメラ手続はほとんど活用されていなかったが、近時、知財高判平成28年3月28日(清水裁判長)で実施されたことから注目を集めている。

インカメラ手続については、従前は、保持者が提出を拒む「正当理由」の存否の判断に必要な場合に限定されていたが、平成30年特許法改正では、これに加え、侵害立証又は損害計算のために必要な書類であるか否かの判断に必要な場合もインカメラ手続を行うことができるようになった(特許法105条2項)。これにより、たとえば、被告製品の構造に争いがあり、被告が構成要件充足性を否認した点に営業秘密性があるから開示できないと主張するような場合に活用されることが想定される。また、インカメラ手続を通じて文書の保持者に文書を提出させた際、当事者の同意を得て、その文書を専門委員に開示し、専門的知見を聞くことができるようにもなった(特許法105条4項)。

2-4 秘密保持命令

秘密保持命令とは、営業秘密を含む準備書面や証拠について、当該訴訟の追行の目的以外の目的への使用や、秘密保持命令を受けた者以外の者への開示を禁止することにより、営業秘密を訴訟手続に顕出することを容易にし、営業秘密の保護および侵害行為の立証の容易化を図るものである。

秘密保持命令の発令件数は、少ない。東京地裁において、秘密保持命令の発令件数は、1件(2008年)、3件(2009年)、1件(2010年)、3件(2011年)、5件(2012年)、4件(2013年)、2件(2014年)、1件(2015年)である。発令件数が少ないのは、秘密保持命令違反に対し、刑事罰という強力なペナルティがあることが大きな原因であると思われる。また、秘密保持命令は、当事者、代理人、裁判所にとって負担が大きい制度であるため、まずは当事者間で締結される秘密保持契約で処理できないか、訴訟記録の閲覧等の制限(民事訴訟法92条)で十分に保護が図れないか、という観点から慎重に検討した上で、秘密保持命令の申立てに進むかを判断するという運用がされている。

秘密保持命令は、製薬特許侵害訴訟において初めて発令された(東京地決平成18年9月15日、判時1973号131頁、髙部裁判長)。すなわち、後発医薬品会社が、薬事法上の承認を受けた先発医薬品との同等性を検証するために、輸入承認申請書に添付して厚労省に提出した資料に記載された情報(試験方法、規格等)について秘密保持命令を申し立てたところ、裁判所は、秘密保持命令を発令した。

秘密保持命令の申立ては、仮処分事件においても可能である(最決平成21年1月27日、民集63巻1号271頁)。秘密保持命令が発令された事件においては、技術説明会の運営に工夫が必要である。すなわち、専門委員にコンタミネーションの危険が生じるため、専門委員の選任が容易ではなくなるし、また、当事者の担当者の出席も困難となる。秘密保持命令の名宛人となった代理人としては、発令後に提出する準備書面等に秘密保持命令の対象となった営業秘密を記載することは避けるべきであり、また、期日において秘密の内容を口頭で述べることがないように注意する必要がある。秘密保持命令は取り消されるまで効力が続くので、秘密保持命令を受けた企業の担当者については、命令の遵守状況を確認するため、異動・退職等にかかわらず、連絡先を把握しておく必要がある。

秘密保持命令の名宛人の範囲についても問題となる。企業の担当者を名宛人とする場合、情報のコンタミネーションのリスクが生じ、その後に当該製品開発部門で業務に従事することが事実上困難となる。対象文書が米国の訴訟手続きにおけるProtective Orderの対象としてAttorneys' Eyes Onlyになっている場合に、当事者を名宛人に含めてしまうとProtective Order違反となる。外部の専門家を名宛人として営業秘密の開示ができるかについては見解が分かれているが、否定的に解すると専門家の助力を得た十分な立証活動ができなくなってしまう。この点、立法論として、第三者の専門家を名宛人とできる制度を導入するかが検討されている。

秘密保持命令を発令する前に、秘密保持契約での処理が可能かについて当事者間で話し合うことが一般的であるが、違約金の額、営業秘密の対象、秘密情報の受領者の範囲について争いが生じることが多い。

2-5 閲覧制限

閲覧制限とは、訴訟記録中の秘密記載部分の閲覧を当事者に限り、第三者による閲覧を許さないものである。

知財裁判官は営業秘密保護の重要性を熟知しているので、一般民事事件と比べると、知財事件においては閲覧制限の申立ては認められやすい。

3 法改正

3-1 査証

現行制度においては、特許侵害訴訟における証拠収集手段が十分に機能しているとはいえないことから、法改正の議論がなされてきた。アメリカのディスカバリー手続は、極端であり、高額すぎることから、日本には馴染まないとして参照されず、欧州型の証拠収集手続きであれば日本に馴染む可能性があるとして、ドイツにおける査察制度(Inspection)を参考に、日本に導入することが検討された。ドイツの査察制度は、裁判所が任命する守秘義務を有する技術専門家である査察官が、被疑侵害者側の工場等の施設に行き、被疑侵害者が保有している証拠を査察し、裁判所に報告書を提出するという手続きである。しかし、企業側から、「証拠収集ということで工場内に入って来て、作り方を全部見せろとか、それを参考にしてノウハウを盗み取ろうとする勢力が出現した場合は非常に困る」といった訴えられた側の営業秘密漏洩の危険に対する強い懸念が示され、いったんは導入が見送られた。

その後、再度議論され、令和元年改正において、査証制度として導入された(改正特許法105条の2)。査証制度とは、特許権侵害の可能性がある場合、中立な技術専門家(査証人)が被疑侵害者の工場等に立ち入り、特許権の侵害立証に必要な調査を行い、裁判所に報告書を提出する制度である。査証は提訴後のみ認められ、①必要性(対象が立証に必要なものであること)、②蓋然性(特許権侵害訴訟の相手方が侵害したことを疑うに足りる相当な理由)、③補充性(他の手段では当該証拠の収集ができないこと)、④相当性(「当該証拠の収集に要すべき時間又は査証を受けるべき当事者の負担が不相当なものとなることその他の事情により、相当でないと認めるとき」に該当しないこと)の発令要件を満たした場合に認められる。査証人は、相手方の工場等への立入り、相手方に対する質問、書類等の提示、装置の作動、計測、実験その他裁判所の許可を受けた行為を実施する。相手方当事者以外の第三者の工場等への立入りは想定していない。相手方に対しては、資料収集への協力義務を課し、裁判所が認めた範囲内における査証人の要求を拒んだ場合については、裁判所の裁量により真実擬制が行われる。査証人は、査証報告書を作成して裁判所に提出する。査証報告書の写しは、査証を受けた当事者に送達される。査証を受けた当事者は、送達の日から2週間以内に、査証報告書の全部又は一部を申立人に開示しないことを申し立てることができる。裁判所は、正当な理由があると認めるときは、査証報告書の全部又は一部を申立人に開示しないとすることができる。査証制度は、公布の日である令和元年 5 月 17 日から1年6月を超えない範囲内において政令で定める日に施行される。査証制度に関する裁判所の運用が注目される。

Takanori ABE 阿部隆徳
 

Mr Abe is a lawyer, admitted in both Japan and New York. He is currently a guest professor at Osaka University Graduate School of Medicine and was formerly a lecturer at the University of Tokyo Graduate School of Medicine and Faculty of Medicine. He is an arbitrator in Japan.

Mr Abe works on a wide range of international and corporate matters with a focus on intellectual property law and international commerce. The patent litigations that he has participated in cover the fields of pharmaceuticals, chemistry, electronics and machinery. These often involve advanced technology such as biotechnology and semiconductors, etc. They are also frequently cross-border matters.

阿部国際総合法律事務所、代表パートナー

弁護士・ニューヨーク州弁護士・大阪大学大学院医学系研究科招聘教授

阿部弁護士は、仲裁人候補者でもあり、また、過去には東京大学大学院医学系研究科非常勤講師も務めた。阿部弁護士は、知財と渉外に専門性を有しており、バイオや半導体等の最先端分野を含む、製薬・化学・電機・機械等の分野の特許訴訟を担当し、クロスボーダー案件も手掛ける。



Comments






More from the Managing IP blog


null null null

nullnullnull

null

July /August 2019

AI and IP: the view from above

Managing IP speaks to the directors of WIPO and the EUIPO to gauge their views on AI, asking how the technology can help the offices be more efficient and whether job losses are inevitable



Most read articles

Supplements