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UK government extends PIPCU funding



James Nurton, London


The City of London Police Intellectual Property Crime Unit has been promised a further £3 million ($4.8 million) by UK Minister for IP Baroness Neville-Rolfe

The money will come from the UK IPO and will fund the Unit from 2015 until 2017.

The Unit was set up with £2.56 million in funding from the IPO in September 2013. This covered the first two years of operation.

PIPCU comprises: 21 detectives, police staff investigators, analysts, researchers, an education officer and a communications officer. There are two secondees from the UK IPO and the BPI.

Since launching, PIPCU claims to have investigated more than £29 million ($47 million) worth of IP crime and suspended 2,359 domain names. It says it has seized more than £1.29 million-worth of suspected fake goods and diverted more than 5 million visits away from copyright-infringing sites (see image right).

PIPCU has also set up Operation Creative and the Infringing Website List.

More information about PIPCU is in the IP Crime Group report 2013/2014.


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