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Signs of life for doctrine of equivalents in the US

Michael Loney, New York


Some recent Federal Circuit decisions as well as a petition to the Supreme Court suggest the doctrine of equivalents is not dead in the US, despite a declining number of decisions referencing the doctrine since Warner-Jenkinson in 1997

The number of US patent decisions referencing the doctrine of equivalents has been falling for two decades. In 2000, the Federal Circuit referenced the doctrine of equivalents in almost 40% of decisions; in 2016, this figure was lower than 10%,...


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@gtlaw Hi - can we use one of your photos in the AIPPI Congress News please?

Oct 16 2017 09:50 ·  reply ·  retweet ·  favourite
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Will anyone admit to reading the article and not realising it was a fictional case?! https://t.co/hXkuh335gH

Oct 16 2017 04:18 ·  reply ·  retweet ·  favourite
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Gripping testimony from @SimonTheTam about The Slants legal battle in trademark session at #aippi2017 “I decided I… https://t.co/iTHWmS4loM

Oct 16 2017 03:30 ·  reply ·  retweet ·  favourite
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