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Facebook feels users’ wrath over Instagram terms of service

Eileen McDermott, New York


Facebook’s fleeting decision to change Instagram’s terms of service yesterday highlights the fine line in social media between sound business policies and PR nightmares

"Legally, the scope of the rights that a company has in user and/or user-generated content depends on the grant of rights provisions in its Terms of Service," said Michael Kasdan of Amster Rothstein & Ebenstein. This means that companies must spell out clearly what their rights are for users in order to guarantee maximum monetisation of the site's content.

Under Facebook's proposed model...


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Businesses raise concerns that amendments to Canadian TM law would increase TM squatting. http://t.co/HcH9J71r0n

Nov 21 2014 04:24 ·  reply ·  retweet ·  favourite
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Korea struggles to increase tech transfer rates, an issue many countries are dealing with http://t.co/aEpYODJro4 http://t.co/pvYuY8WvZ2

Nov 21 2014 04:22 ·  reply ·  retweet ·  favourite
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Nick Aries discussing the parody defence & the @rustyrockets #parklife video at #IPFuture "It would be an interesting test case" #copyright

Nov 20 2014 05:26 ·  reply ·  retweet ·  favourite
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