How to tackle Chinese trade mark squatters


Linda Chang explains why bad faith under Chinese law is often misunderstood by foreign trade mark owners, and how new amendments to the law could improve enforcement

With more and more Chinese individuals and organisations realising the possibilities for abuse in China's first-to-file trade mark registration, trade mark squatting has become a very profitable business. Squatters just need to spend a couple of thousand renminbi to file with the Chinese Trade Mark Office and become the owner of a brand, so long as it is not yet registered. If the legitimate owner cannot successfully oppose the application, it will have to forgo or re-brand for the Chinese market, or buy back the trade mark for thousands to millions of renminbi. This taking of another party's trade mark by merely registering it early is known as bad faith registration....


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Slightly truncated today, but here's our weekly round up of IP news & developments feat. UK, Ireland & Singapore http://t.co/BNmL43gxoN

Aug 22 2014 05:00 ·  reply ·  retweet ·  favourite
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Re #AppSung settlement, what we really want to know is: what are all the patent lawyers working on the case going to do now?

Aug 22 2014 04:07 ·  reply ·  retweet ·  favourite
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Friday reading: @FOSSpatents on the #appsung patent settlement & lessons learned http://t.co/MDPnq7rxV4 #mipblog http://t.co/N3dJgX5i2M

Aug 22 2014 03:39 ·  reply ·  retweet ·  favourite
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