Cyprus: How to protect IP rights in Cyprus


Elean Papachristoforou of Andreas Neocleous in Cyprus examines the different means of protection available in the country, and explains how the law has changed following EU accession in 2004

Intellectual property is any product of human intellect that is unique and novel with some value in the marketplace. IP laws cover ideas, inventions, literary creations, unique names, business models, industrial processes, computer program codes and more.

Article 2 of the World Intellectual Property Convention of 1968 defines IP as including:

Literary, artistic and scientific works; Performances of performing artists, phonograms and broadcasts; Inventions in all field of human endeavour; Scientific discoveries; Industrial designs; Trade marks, service marks and commercial names and designations; Protection against unfair competition; and All other rights resulting from intellectual activity in the industrial, scientific, literary or artistic fields. Cyprus has been developing this area of law along with the rest of the world so as to protect local as well as international IP rights. It is a signatory to a number of treaties and the latest...


Please log in to read the rest of this article.

New to Managing Intellectual Property? Take advantage of one week’s FREE access and become a Managing IP member today. It’s free to join and the benefits start straight away.

Already registered?

Please make sure you log in to read the rest of the article.

Log in

Join us now

Gain 7 days FREE access when you register now.

Join here

More from the Managing IP blog


April 2014

India's trade mark office goes digital

India’s legal system, including its trade mark registry, has long been criticised for long pendency times and a morass of bureaucratic obstacles. However, a recent push toward digitisation has brought much-welcomed efficiency gains. Peter Leung reports



Most read articles

Supplements